A Clean Room: A Clear Mind

by Chelsey Zumpano

I just got through cleaning my room and it feels nice to have everything in it’s place and a place for everything. Having a clean room makes me feel less stressed. Knowing where all my art supplies is means I can make more art. It also means that my desk is less cluttered.

I feel like I can focus better on projects and now I have cool stuff displayed on my cabinet, which will look cool in videos. I just have to get a new curtain and it’ll look even greater.

Cleaning my room will help me sleep better, work on more videos, do art projects like I said, find my clothes better because my closet was getting unorganized, and just hanging out in my room. It’s like when my room was messy and unorganized: my brain was messy and unorganized too. My brain would jump from one thing to the next and now I’ll be able to focus.

Let me know what helps you focus in the comments.

If you have anymore ideas for me or want to share some of your own hobbies, tell me in the comments. If you would like to be interviewed or otherwise contribute to this blog or YouTube send an email to:

viblindresources

A Day Of Not Looking At My screen!

by Chelsey Zumpano

As a Blogger and YouTuber: I spend a lot of time looking at a screen, but this isn’t good for my eyes, (or anyones really). I read that your supposed to spend twenty minutes looking at your screen and twenty minutes looking away from it, but I did one better and didn’t look at my screen at all for two days! It really helped my eyes feel good. What I did was turn on VoiceOver and then I turned on the screen curtain. I read with my BrailleNote and listened to VoiceOver talk. It’s something I want to do all the time now.

I want to work staying off my Ipad all together and doing more things that don’t involve looking at a screen. Here is a list of hobbies to get myself off the screen.

1 walking the dogs

2 playing with the dogs

3 sewing

4 painting and drawing

5 reading on my BrailleNote

6 listening to an audio book

7 writing on my BrailleNote

9 dancing

10 learning guitar

11 doing craft projects

12 going on a bike ride

At least three of these are still on my Ipad, but the others involve me doing something else. If you have anymore ideas for me or want to share some of your own hobbies, tell me in the comments. If you would like to be interviewed or otherwise contribute to this blog or YouTube send an email to:

viblindresources@gmail.com

Blogging vs YouTube

by Chelsey Zumpano

I’m writing this while I drink hot chocolate and cudle with audrey. I’m going to tell yall some of the things I like about YouTube and Blogging.

YouTube is easier when I just want to say something real quick and I don’t have to worry about writing for the moment. It’s easier to show you certain things in a video, like how I edit videos or how I take out and clean my fake eye, (by the way, let me know if you’d be interested in seeing a video on that)? I’m a lot more spontaneous with videos because I over think my writing. Making videos have help me to be more confident with talking.

When I’m blogging it takes longer because I’m constantly spell checking and worrying about how things sound. I can write anywhere! In a crowd of loud people, in the car, when I’m jamming out to music, and in a dark room. I feel like sometimes I can be freer with my writing, but at the same time I have to have a plan of what I’m writing. I can stay in my PJs all day and curl up with my animals. I don’t have to worry about what I’m wearing or what my hair looks like. My eyes get to take a brake.

Editing for both is a pain! I get so annoyed hearing my own voice sometimes that I have to stop for awhile. When I’m editing a blog it’s a little easier because I can ask my Alexa how to spell things. Writing these past 15 days, (Yay, I’m doing great), has taught me better spelling and that writing is easier to do when I’m feeling overwhelmed and don’t feel like being on camera.

Let me know what you think of YouTube and Blogging in the comments. If you would like to be interviewed or otherwise contribute to this blog or YouTube send an email to:

viblindresources@gmail.com

Find What Works For Your Anxiety!

by Chelsey Zumpano

I have anxiety and here is a list of coping skills that help me and might help you.

1 Fidget Toys give me something else to focus on.

2 YouTube has given me an outlet for some of my feelings and has helped me to become more confident.

3 Writing and that’s whether I’m writing on this blog, fanfiction, original books, or in my journal.

4 My animals help me to feel calm and safe.

5 Talking to friends and family.

6 Yoga and I do this with the ‘Eyes Free Fitness’ app that is completely accessible!

7 Taking deep breaths when I start to feel panicky.

8 Knowing your triggers and coming up with coping skills to help with them.

9 Having friends who get it!

10 having a book to fall into!

IF you want to learn more about some of my coping skills watch my mental Health playlist.

If you would like to be interviewed or otherwise contribute to this blog or YouTube send an email to:

viblindresources@gmail.com

Let me know what coping skills help you!

Books Bring Joy!

by Chelsey Zumpano

Everyone knows I’m a major bookworm, but did you know that November is Family literacy Month! In addition to reading us stories my mom told us stories like ‘Hansel and Gretel,’ but with us as the characters. I was so into stories that I use to talk to myself about what I did that day to help myself fall asleep.

Some books that stick out to me from when we were little are this one about to little cats who were expecting a little sibling and my mom read this to me and my twin brother before my sister was born. There were more like ‘If You Give A Mouse A Cookie,’ ‘If You Give A Pig A Pancake,’ ‘The Old Woman Who swallowed A Fly,’ ‘the Little Woman Who Lived In A Shoe,’ ‘Ramona Quinby,’ ‘Junie B Jones,’ and much more! One of the first ever Audio books I’ve read was ‘Sarah Plain and Tall’ and from there I was hooked on Audible! I grew to fall in love with reading and eventually I read ‘Harry Potter’ in braille. In seventh grade my mom read me ‘Twilight’ and I fell in love with Stephenie Meyer’s world. ‘Twilight’ helped me through my eye surgery I had that year by giving me a chance to get out of my head and into Bella’s for awhile.

After that I read ‘The House of Night series’ ‘percy Jackson and The Olympians,’ leading me to fall in love with the rest of Rick Riordan’s books.

Books have shaped me so much that I’ve written some of my own that you will hopefully see soon. So read to your kids and you’ll never know how it could shape their life.

If you would like to be interviewed or otherwise contribute to this blog or YouTube send an email to:

viblindresources@gmail.com

A Twilight Adventure

by Chelsey Zumpano

If you clicked on this thinking it was a fanfiction: well I’m sorry to disappoint. LOL I’ve never wrote a twilight fanfiction, yet, but anyway on to today’s post.

Last night at twilight me and Mom went on a walk to practice my first rout. We hadn’t intended to walk that late, but it was a great experience! We walked to the park with me leading the way, Mom would remind me how many streets to cross. I only held on to her shoulder once on the way back because I wasn’t sure if I could walk a strate line with out being able to see the crosswalk, but I realized I could see the lines with the help of the street lights.

I’ve never done mobility at night before and it really helped me put my skills to the test. I did pretty well, but I don’t walk a very straight line and I hesitate when I think there’s going to be a corner. I’m good at street crossing, but I could be better because I do hesitate. I rely a lot on my vision, (which isn’t a bad thing), just something I noticed.

Mom and I decided that I’m not aloud to hold on to her unless there’s a crowd or we are going into a store and my eyes need to adjust. This way I become more independent.

If you would like to be interviewed or otherwise contribute to this blog or YouTube send an email to:

viblindresources@gmail.com

Twilight isn’t my favorite time of day!

by Chelsey Zumpano

The sky a mix of blue, purple, and Cotton candy pink.

(Picture credit goes to Chelsey Zumpano).

Twilight is one of my favorite book series, but it’s not my favorite time of day. It’s the safest time of day for our favorite sparkly vampires, but it’s the worsed time of day for my vision. It’s the time of day where the sky is a combination of purple and blue that makes the sky look like a bruise, when the last raies of the sun glint pink along the horizon. It’s then as Apollo drives his Sun Chariot one last time across the sky and his twin sister, (Artemis), prepares her Moon Chariot to replace her twin in the sky, that people start to look like silhouettes to me.

During twilight I can’t follow people, so I usually hold on to my mom’s shoulder or my sister’s arm, (just above her elbow). When we go into stores the lights are to bright at first and then my eyes adjust, but when we go outside my eyes take a long time to adjust to the dimness.

It would be better if it just skipped strate to night because my eyes try to focus on the blurry, indistinct people and objects. At night as Artemis begins her journey across the sky: there are no more deep shadows, no more straining my eyes, or hyperfocusing, (just the sky the darkest shade of blue and the street lights to light my way). The darkness is better because my eyes don’t have to constantly adjust to the changing light. The darkness is soft and not flitting from deeper and deeper purples and blues.

It hasn’t always been this way: when I was growing up twilight was just another time of day for me. After I had my eye surgery in seventh grade it changed. The first time it happend: it felt like a dream, like it wasn’t really happening to me, but at the same time the memory feels sharp and stuck in my brain. It was like everything went dim and fuzzy around the edges. It was tarifying, but my eye Doctor told me that this was my new normal and that reassured me. It was just something i’d have to adjust and get use to.

Over the years: I’ve gotten use to the new normal that twilight has become, but sometimes I still get hyper aware of it and that’s just my normal anxiety talking.

If you would like to be interviewed or otherwise contribute to this blog or YouTube send an email to:

viblindresources@gmail.com

Before I get A Guide Dog To Do List

by Chelsey Zumpano

After going to Guide Dogs for the Blind, (in Vlog61) I learned a lot, so I’m going to share it with everyone.

I realized it wasn’t as far away as I thought and this helped relieve some of my anxiety. I’ve attended their Life Style work Shop: once before when I was younger, but this time I feel like I got better information and I’m in a different mind set now. I have better coping skills for my anxiety and I feel more confident in myself.

I learned how to brush a dogs teeth and I’m going to try to practice with my dogs because we just give them dental bones. Yes, you can have other animals and have a guide dog. You introduce your dogs on neutral territory, like the park. If they don’t get a long at first you seperate them.

There’s one thing that I loved that they pointed out: which was that you should only give your dog a bath about once a month! This is something i’ve been telling people for years and no one believes me, the thing is my uncle is a vet, so I know this is true. This is for all dogs: service dogs and pet dogs. You can give them a bath more if they rolled in mud or something. The reason you shouldn’t give your dog a bath that offten is because the natural oils in their skin keep them warm. They have wipes that you can use for their feet and I’m pretty sure there’s doggy perfume.

I’m going to go to this awesome mobility program called, “Orientation and Mobility Immersion Program.” The program teaches you the skills you need to work with a guide dog such as auditory info, increasing your awareness for a guide dog traveler, doing a Juneau walk, (a pretend guide dog), and much more.

Now here’s my to do list!

1 do three routs independently

2 take Dial-A-Ride

3 sign up for the Orientation and Mobility program

4 get Ginger and Lucy a dog stroller

5 figure out where the dogs are going to sleep after I get the guide dog

I will come back and add more to the list and check things off as I go.

If you would like to be interviewed or otherwise contribute to this blog or YouTube send an email to:

viblindresources@gmail.com

Meet the Blind Month: My Eyes Hate This Weather!

by Chelsey Zumpano

I love fall the crunch of leaves under foot, the sweet taste of caramel apples, the heat of hot chocolate in my belly, going to the pumpkin patch, curling up under a blanket with my favorite book, and being able to wear hoodies again. But there is a huge down side to fall that most people wouldn’t think of and that’s the weather, ′more specifically how the weather effects my vision′.

I’ve mentioned in videos before how overcast days are really bad for me: the light is to bright and it reflects off every thing making it hard to see. Then when I go inside my eyes need to adjust, (just like when it’s sunny), so I still wear sun glasses. But right now a lot of my sun glasses seem to dark, even when it’s sunny out.

Another thing that can happen to me on overcast days is migraines and my migraines mean that everything is to bright and there are deeper shadows, (along with a head ake), I used to get them a lot back in high school and my eyes already had, (and still have), truble focusing before 9:00 o’clock and migraines don’t help. Part of the reason is I don’t sleep well, but mostly my eyes just don’t like the early morning.

The best thing for me to get rid of migraines is sleep and ibuprofen for the headache part. Some other things that have helpt me recently are turning the screen curtain on my Ipad and reading on my BrailleNote, turning on invert colors on my Ipad takes some of the brightness away, and not using my Ipad at all. I also sometimes feel like everything is to loud on those days, so I can’t edit videos. So limiting my use on my Ipad is best and to just read on my BrailleNote, but I don’t always do this.

I know when I’m on my Ipad all the time it makes my vision worse, which inturn makes my anxiety worse because I’m hyperaware of how my vision is. It doesn’t matter that this happens every year my anxiety doesn’t care! Maybe I choose not to remember this time of year or I block it out. Whatever the case my anxiety is just really bad around this time of year. It’s like when I’m feeling really overwhelmed with all the people talking my brain hyperfocuses on how dim/yellow the lighting is and then I’m working myself into a panic attack. Some things that help me are to get away from everyone for awhile: I usually go in my room, outside, or another room with less people.

I’ve decided to write a vision and anxiety journal to help myself cope better. I’ve found writing and talking my thoughts out helps me to feel less like my anxiety is controlling my life and it’s all thanks to this blog and YouTube. The journal will be for myself only becxs good to do something just for yourself and yourself alone.

Let me know down in the coments: if the weather effects your vision and what you do to help it? Also if you’d like to be interviewed on this blog or contribute to this YouTube Channel send an email to:

viblindresources@gmail.com